Residence halls

Women's Dormitory

An article in The Dickinsonian explained that construction on the new women's dormitory was ahead of schedule and was expected to be ready for the next year's class. Ground-breaking for the new dormitory took place on February 8, 1962, and the administration chalked up the early completion to good summer weather and the work of the construction company. The residence hall would have 125 rooms, suites for two house mothers, an air-conditioned recreation room, and a dining hall for 250 people. A federal loan and college funds would pay for the project.

Date: September 20, 1962
New Social Rules Changes Result from SREC Efforts

An article in The Dickinsonian, "New Social Rules Changes Result from SREC Efforts," explained some of the changes adopted that the Social Rules Evaluation Committee proposed, including unchaperoned visiting hours for women in fraternity houses as well as more permissive visiting policies for men in sorority houses. The SREC's proposals also resulted in increased late hours and car privileges for upperclass women with a minimum grade point average.

Date: September 21, 1961
Another Dormitory for Women

An article in The Dickinsonian reported that the college planned to build another new dormitory for women over the next two years, beginning in February.  The financial vice-president, Dr. Shuman, explained that the building was made possible by a $675,000 government loan.

Date: September 21, 1961
Nothing to do

The Dickinsonian reports on the issue of campus rules and surveys student opinions. One fraternity man described the social rules as puritannical. Bill Jones disagreed with the rule regarding women visitors in fraternity houses. According to the article, many students expressed disatisfaction over the "lack of places for couples or mixed groups to meet informally...." Shirley Bahrs complained of the lack of activities on campus, and Betsy Kraft bemoaned the fact that Drayer Hall, a women's dormitory, had no recreation room.

Date: October 28, 1960
Joanie, Joanie sad and lonely

A poem by Carla Russ (Class of 1964) in The Dickinsonian addressed the lack of activities for female students. Entitled A Pertinent Poem, it begins "Mary, Mary quite contrary, what did you do tonight?" The poem uses four names as inspiration for rhyme schemes (Mary, Jeanie, Pammy, Joanie), posing a question to each character. Their responses are all variations on the same theme, and the last section, which addresses Joanie, complains, "What's legal doesn't meet our needs,/ What's fun is tagged taboo!"

Date: October 28, 1960
Dens of Immorality

An editorial in The Dickinsonian criticizes campus social rules, especially those that pertain to women. The author insists that students are capable of behaving well and gives the example of the faculty allowing women visitors upstairs in fraternities, which "did not result in an upsurge of pregnancies." The editorial calls upon the Women's Interdormitory Council to extend these curfews on weekends to bring Dickinson's policies in line with comparable schools. The author also believes that the college should allow drinking upstairs in the fraternity when women are not present.

Date: February 25, 1966
Growing Permissiveness

In "The View from Here," Tom Fornwalt responds to a New York Times article of April 25, 1966 that addresses the university's role in student life. According to this article, some universities surveyed were reluctant to legislate student conduct "in loco parentis," although they have been slow to adjust to the sexual revolution. University officials expressed more concern with drug use than with students' sexual behavior.

Date: May 13, 1966
Drayer Hall

Drayer Hall was the first residence hall in Dickinson’s history built by the college solely for women. This photo depicts a woman relaxing in a Drayer Hall dorm room, c. 1950. The name of the woman is not known. If you recognize her, feel free to post the information below.

Date: 1950
Drayer Hall

Drayer Hall was the first residence hall in Dickinson’s history built by the college solely for women. This photo depicts three women studying in a Drayer Hall dorm room, c. 1950. The names of the women are not known. If you recognize someone in the photo, feel free to post the information below.

Date: 1950
Drayer Hall

Drayer Hall was the first residence hall in Dickinson’s history built by the college solely for women. This photo depicts two women studying in a Drayer Hall dorm room,
c. 1950. The names of the women are not known. If you recognize someone
in the photo, feel free to post the information below.

Date: 1950