Browse documents by date

  • warning: Declaration of views_handler_field::query() should be compatible with views_handler::query($group_by = false) in /var/www/coeducation/sites/all/modules/views/handlers/views_handler_field.inc on line 0.
  • warning: Declaration of content_handler_field::element_type($none_supported = false, $default_empty = false) should be compatible with views_handler_field::element_type($none_supported = false, $default_empty = false, $inline = false) in /var/www/coeducation/sites/all/modules/cck/includes/views/handlers/content_handler_field.inc on line 0.
  • warning: Declaration of views_handler_argument::options_validate(&$form, &$form_state) should be compatible with views_handler::options_validate($form, &$form_state) in /var/www/coeducation/sites/all/modules/views/handlers/views_handler_argument.inc on line 0.
  • warning: Declaration of views_handler_argument::query() should be compatible with views_handler::query($group_by = false) in /var/www/coeducation/sites/all/modules/views/handlers/views_handler_argument.inc on line 0.
  • warning: Declaration of date_api_argument_handler::options_validate($form, &$form_state) should be compatible with views_handler_argument::options_validate(&$form, &$form_state) in /var/www/coeducation/sites/all/modules/date/includes/date_api_argument_handler.inc on line 398.
  • warning: Declaration of views_handler_sort::options_validate(&$form, &$form_state) should be compatible with views_handler::options_validate($form, &$form_state) in /var/www/coeducation/sites/all/modules/views/handlers/views_handler_sort.inc on line 0.
  • warning: Declaration of views_handler_sort::options_submit(&$form, &$form_state) should be compatible with views_handler::options_submit($form, &$form_state) in /var/www/coeducation/sites/all/modules/views/handlers/views_handler_sort.inc on line 0.
  • warning: Declaration of views_handler_sort::query() should be compatible with views_handler::query($group_by = false) in /var/www/coeducation/sites/all/modules/views/handlers/views_handler_sort.inc on line 0.
  • warning: Declaration of views_handler_filter::options_validate(&$form, &$form_state) should be compatible with views_handler::options_validate($form, &$form_state) in /var/www/coeducation/sites/all/modules/views/handlers/views_handler_filter.inc on line 0.
  • warning: Declaration of views_handler_filter::query() should be compatible with views_handler::query($group_by = false) in /var/www/coeducation/sites/all/modules/views/handlers/views_handler_filter.inc on line 0.
  • warning: Declaration of views_plugin_query::options_submit(&$form, &$form_state) should be compatible with views_plugin::options_submit($form, &$form_state) in /var/www/coeducation/sites/all/modules/views/plugins/views_plugin_query.inc on line 0.
  • warning: Declaration of views_plugin_style_default::options(&$options) should be compatible with views_object::options() in /var/www/coeducation/sites/all/modules/views/plugins/views_plugin_style_default.inc on line 0.
  • warning: Declaration of views_plugin_row::options_validate($form, &$form_state) should be compatible with views_plugin::options_validate(&$form, &$form_state) in /var/www/coeducation/sites/all/modules/views/plugins/views_plugin_row.inc on line 0.

Date: May 28, 1963

At the close of her sophomore year, Judith Rogers, one of the first African Americans to receive campus housing at Dickinson, had received two distinctions.

Date: 1963

Rules concerning balconies of residence halls are detailed in "Red Tape," a guidebook for women. Residents of Drayer, Adams, and Stellar halls were allowed to sunbathe on the balconies while non-residents were limited to the balconies of Drayer and Adams. Yelling from sun porches was not permitted and female students were prohibited from holding conversations with men through residence hall windows from the balconies as well as fire escapes.

Strict hours for "men guests" in female residence halls are listed in "Red Tape," a guidebook published by the Women's Student Government. "Men guests" could only be entertained in parlors and recreation rooms of female dormitories and were restricted from bedrooms. Hours for male visitors began at noon and ended at the hostesses curfew. All female students were instructed to use "good judgement" when entertaining male guests in the lounges and were cautioned that there should be "lady-like conduct at all times."

Acceptable dress for female students to classes or appointments with faculty consisted of "campus clothes" (a skirt, sweater, blouse, and casual dress). Exceptions to the dress code were made during lab and final exams where "sports clothes" were allowed to be worn.
 

According to the 1963 publication of "Red Tape," female students were expected to abide by strict rules concerning closing hours of dormitory halls. Students were not allowed to leave the dormitory prior to 6:30 am unless special permission was granted by the House Director. Female students were strongly "urged no to be outside her dormitory after dark" unless accompanied by another female student.

"Red Tape" is a guidebook published by the Women's Student Government in 1963 that contains general information on dormitory regulations and campus procedures for women. Tests were given to female students their first fall semester covering the material in Red Tape.

'Serenades' is a section included in "Red Tape" a guidebook published by the Women's Student Government Association. According to the guidebook, "no serenades will take place after midnight" and any girls "being serenaded may go outside with the permission of the house director."

Date: September 20, 1963

An advertisement in The Dickinsonian for the Fashion House sets up a fictive, romantic tale for a Dickinson co-ed. "She hadn't seen him since June," reads the copy, "just happened to look out the window as his car pulled into the Drayer drive..." The advertisement revolves around what the co-ed wears to meet this man.

Date: September 26, 1963

Dickinson junior Judy Rogers, after spending the summer in Sierra Leone as part of the Operation Crossroads Africa (OCA) program, shared her experiences with her classmates and local communities. Rogers remarked on the similarities between African cities and American cities, and her own intimate participation in Sierra Leonean culture: students were expected to live as the local people did, eating their food and donning traditional dress when appropriate.

Date: September 27, 1963

JoAnne Harris wrote an article on fashion for the college woman entitled "College Wardrobe Planning Demands Practical Thought"  in The Dickinsonian. Harris begins by citing Cinderella's wardrobe predicament as one shared by all college women. She interviewed Robert Einstein of the Fashion House and Mrs. Houston of the Boutique in order to discover the secret of planning a successful wardrobe in college. The interviewees warned that practical fashion did not mean dull fashion and claimed that what women wore during college would become their style after college.

Date: October 4, 1963

In a letter to the editor of The Dickinsonian, JoAnne Harris discusses the social rules for co-eds at Dickinson College. She discusses the benefits accrued by the "Rules Experiment" when the college permitted more drinking and loosened social rules. She explained why she believed the college needed to take a more rigid stance on drinking rules, but she asserted that co-eds would need to exercise personal responsibility in Fraternity houses regardless of the rules or their enforcement.

Penny Kingman, who wrote a column for The Dickinsonian entitled "Two Cents Worth," created a humorous piece about "collegiat wind-up" dolls. "Wind up the Co-ed doll and she winds up the Fraternity doll," writes Kingman. She jokes that Co-ed dolls will go too fast if wound up too tight and that Sorority dolls put on pins.

Under a section entitled "Twinings" in The Dickinsonian, the editorial staff listed campus marriages, engagements, and pinnings.

The Fashion House of Carlisle advertised in The Dickinsonian that Marli Hamblin had won her "choice of any gorgeous mohair sweater" in the store.

Date: October 11, 1963

In another Fashion House advertisement in The Dickinsonian, Sue, the heroine of the mini-story, is speaking with her friend. Judy tells her that the man who committed some wrong against her was "sorry, and he's downstairs now." After a moment of hesitation, Sue decides to meet him downstairs and dons a villager corduroy shift before checking her appearance. The moral, explains the advertisement's copy, is that "Fashion House clothes are equal to any emergency in life's little adventures."

Date: October 25, 1963

An article in The Dickinsonian chronicles the Dickinson adventures of Laila Nada, a freshman co-ed from Egypt who had never left her country before coming to Dickinson. A biology major, the international co-ed wanted to continue her education after Dickinson and planned to remain in the United States over the summer. She reported that Dickinson students were more friendly than Egyptians and admitted that she would like to see a women's swimming team at Dickinson.

Ditti Weinel wrote of the influence of the Western look on East Coast campuses in The Dickinsonian. This look included jumpers, shifts and separates in rich, warm colors. Weinel ends: "So out of the Golden West come sporty, but feminine, fashions with an air of casual living and a touch of tailored elegance to teach those 'citified' Easterners what it's like to be well dressed."

Date: November 15, 1963

In an article entitled "Analysis Suggests Sororities at Dickinson Serve No Purposes and Produce Barriers," a writer for The Dickinsonian explores whether or not sororities are justifiable at a liberal arts college. The author argues that it is not difficult to make friends on a small campus and that there is a psychological danger to the rejection some face at the hands of sororities. Moreover, the author called for sororities to justify their existence, especially in light of the discrimination they practiced toward black women.

Date: November 22, 1963

In The Dickinsonian, the "Twinings" sections lists couples who have become pinned or engaged. This issue of newspaper also features those who have been "safety pinned." In this case, Darla and Bill Paterson gave birth to Scott William.

Date: December 10, 1963

During a talk in chapel, college chaplain Joseph Washington, Jr.

Date: 1964

This photo depicts student Judy Rogers and Jim Robinson during a Project Africa event in 1964.

Date: March 13, 1964

An article in The Dickinsonian entitled "Married Students Exchange Ideas at First Group Social" reports that Dickinson students are following the trend of other college campuses by marrying in increasing numbers. In 1964, 20 married students attended classes. Married students at Dickinson formed the first social group, and couples took turns entertaining each other. Many of these students reported academic and social benefits from their marital status.

Date: March 20, 1964

A Dickinsonian reporter summarized the book Sex and the College Girl by Gael Greene. According to the article, entitled "'Sex and the College Girl' Suggests Cult of Cool Coed," discusses Greene's findings. Greene, who interviewed 614 students on 102 campuses, discovered that the breakdown of traditional morality was "making way for a new sex ethic--sex with affection or 'it's right if you're engaged, pinned, lavaliered, going steady or--'in love'..."

Date: April 28, 1964

On April 28, 1964, Gladys Avery Tillett, the U.S.

Date: May 1, 1964

An article by Diane Voneida in The Dickinsonian, "Women Dormitory Residents Vote to Accept Honor Code," explains that over 89 percent of freshman, sophomore, and junior women voted in favor of adopting the honor code at dormitory meetings. The dean of women, Barbara Wishmeyer, approved of the students' decisions, thinking that it would create a more healthy attitude and atmosphere on campus. Under this code, women could appeal rules they thought unfair rather than disobeying them outright. The code also required personal responsibility from each woman for her own behavior.

Date: September 1964

The constitution of the Women's Interdormitory Council outlines rules and regulations for elections, membership, officers, meetings, amendment process, and details the duties of officers as well of the organization.

“A Pocketful of Rules”, one of the various pamphlets published by the Women’s Interdormitory Council in conjunction with the Dean of Women, dictated the rules, regulations, and “proper behavior” that all women attending Dickinson College were required to adhere to. First published in 1964, “A Pocketful of Rules,” specifically outlined procedures and rules of behavior that women were expected to follow in their dormitory life and translate into their social life. It was particularly created to target first year women and guide their adolescent behavior into proper, mature female behavior.

After reading "A Pocketful of Rules" pamphlet, freshman female students were required to sign an "honor code" statement. By signing the honor code statement, female students acknowledged that they understood the rules and regulations concerning dormitory life and promised to uphold the "integrity of the dormitory community." This statement was included in "A Pocketful of Rules" pamphlet given at the start of each academic year.

Female students were required to abide by an 11p.m. curfew during the week and a 1a.m. curfew during the weekend. If a female student was going to violate the mandated curfew it was expected that she call in advance to warn the House Resident of her late arrival to the dorm. Exceptions were made to the curfew if there was an all-college dance, vacation, days proceeding examination periods, and finally if a student received special permission by the Dean of Women. At curfew, attendance was taken and halls were locked. Special permission was needed then to leave the dormitory hall.

This picture and poem is the last page of "A Pocketful of Rules" pamphlet given out at the start of the academic year to every freshman girl. The poem reads, "Sunday's Lady, Sweet and Quiet, Saves her Strength for Monday's Riot."
Notice: she does not have a mouth!

In the general information section of the "A Pocketful of Rules" guidebook are rules on sunbathing, evening walks, and laundry for women. Female students were allowed to sunbathe but only in designated areas, determined by House Council representatives. Female students were "strongly urged" not to take evening walks after dark unaccompanied and laundromats were available to all female students.

Included in all of the "A Pocketful of Rules" guidebook ais a series of pictures and poems. This poem reads, "Saturday is gay and Merry, Sue will dine with Gin and Sherry"

Included in all of the "A Pocketful of Rules" guidebook is a series of pictures and poems. This poem reads, "Monday's child is bright and sassy, quite alert and very classy." This poem is included on the preface page of the guidebook.

Included in all of the "A Pocketful of Rules" guidebook is a series of pictures and poems. This poem reads, "Tuesday child begins to fret, when Tuesday turns out dark and wet."

Included in all of the "A Pocketful of Rules" guidebook is a series of pictures and poems, one for each day of the week. This poem reads, "Tuesday's rain brings Wednesday's flowers, Thursday's Child delights in showers."

Included in all of the "A Pocketful of Rules" guidebook is a series of
pictures and poems, one for each day of the week. This poem reads, "Friday's girl is set for fun, when the busy week is done."

Date: Spetember 1964

The Women's Interdormitory Council mandated all female students to follow an "honor code." The honor code regulated dormitory life and states that students are responsible for reporting themselves and any other woman in violation of dormitory policies. Demerits and loss of special privileges, (such as overnight guests and weekend privileges) served as penalties for infractions of dormitory rules. The Women's Interdormitory Council determined other penalties, not listed in the guidebook, they deemed appropriate based on occurrence of infractions, severity, and consistency of infraction.

Date: October 23, 1964

Date: circa 1965

This photo depicts four women studying in Witwer Hall, c. 1965. The names of the women are not known. If you recognize someone in the photo, please contact the archives at archives@dickinson.edu.

This photo depicts four women in a Witwer Hall bedroom, c. 1965. The names of the women are not known. If you recognize someone in the photo, feel free to post the information below.

This photo depicts three women relaxing in a Matthews Hall dorm room, c. 1955. The names of the women are not known. If you recognize someone in the photo, feel free to post the information below.

This photo depicts four women relaxing in a Witwer Hall common room, c. 1965. The names of the women are not known. If you recognize someone in the photo, feel free to post the information below.

Date: 1965

Maureen Newton (Class of 1965) is featured in the 1965 Microcosm as its Business Manager.

Date: February 26, 1965

In an editorial piece dated February 26, 1965, Joann Hansen expresses her concern witht he state of the women's powder room in Denny Hall. According to Hansen, the room is poorly lit, cold, the pipes dripp, and the women could hear rats crawling in the walls. Moroever, Hansen asserted that males often visit the powder room which does not allow the women a sense of privacy. Thus, Hansen argues that like the rest of Denny, the women's powder room should also be remodeled.

Date: September 1965

Added to the 1965 "A Pocketful of Rules" guidebook is the proper dress attire for Dickinson's dining hall. Women were required to wear "hose and heels" as well as "skirts and blouses." Men were required to wear slacks, dress shirt, tie, and coat.

“A Pocketful of Rules”, one of the various pamphlets published by the
Women’s Interdormitory Council in conjunction with the Dean of Women,
dictated the rules, regulations, and “proper behavior” that all women
attending Dickinson College were required to adhere to. First published
in 1964, “A Pocketful of Rules,” specifically outlined procedures and
rules of behavior that women were expected to follow in their dormitory
life and translate into their social life. It was particularly created
to target first year women and guide their adolescent behavior into

Date: October 8, 1965

The report of the Student Senate Committee on Social Rules to the Faculty Committee on Social Rules was published in The Dickinsonian. The report addresses social rules that pertained to drinking downstairs in fraternities while female students were upstairs, privacy (or, as the reported defined it, the the separation of two persons of the opposite sexes from others), and what other college policies were regarding visiting hours for women. The report listed rules at other colleges, including Swarthmore, Stanford, Reed, Oberlin, Yale, and Haverford.

Date: October 15, 1965

Su Kenderdine, a Dickinson senior, spent 11 weeks in Barbour County, Alabama volunteering with SCOPE (Summer Community Organization for Political Education). Kenderdine joined other Northern college students in the South with the goal of helping "Negroes better their lives by arousing an interest in education and government." As part of their work, Kenderdine and other SCOPE volunteers set up schools in counties across the South and tried to "better job opportunities for Southern Negroes."

Date: December 10, 1965

The Dickinsonian reported that the upcoming symposium would address the topic of "The New Morality" and would feature Betty Friedan, author of The Feminine Mystique, among other speakers. The symposium was designed "to allow the student to come to grips with himself...."Betty Friedan would partner with Dr. Evelyn Duvall in order to discuss "Feminine Fulfillment in a Changing Morality." The article calls Friedan's book a "controversial bestseller."

Date: 1966

OCA (Operation Crossroads Africa) was founded at Dickinson by Judy Rogers, '65. Rogers was the College's first representative in Africa in the summer of 1963. The following summer ('64) three other Dickinson students followed her lead.