Female Faculty

Administrators explain and complain about gender barriers and sexism

Date
March 5, 1992

In this Dickininsonian article from March 1992, the issue of percieved gender roles for professors and staff at the College is discussed. The need for not just more women professors but women professors across all academic disciplines is addressed.

College report evaluates the status of women

Date
October 17, 1991

“Professor Kim Rogers, assistant
professor of history and chairperson of the Commission on the Status of Women,
recently submitted the committee’s final report to Steven McDonald, Associate
Dean of the College and President Fritschler.

Dean Meredith Found a Speaker to Discuss "Sex Hygiene" with Female Students at Dickinson College

Date
January 22, 1920

In a lengthy letter to President Morgan, Dean Meredith discussed chaperons, the inadequacy of Metzger Hall Staff, the running of Metzger Hall, and her family's situation. Most interestingly, Meredith wrote about a woman she met in Harrisburg named Dr. Taylor. According to the letter, Dr. Taylor is willing to give "six to eight talks" to Female Dickinsonians on "the care of the health and sex hygiene." Dean Meredith explained that "Our girls here are very much in need of such instruction.

Josephine B. Meredith's positions on campus

Date
1941

The 1941 Microcosm catalogues Josephine B. Meredith as the Dean of Women, the only female dean at Dickinson College. Meredith was also one of two female professors currently teaching on campus, the other being Mary Ganoe Rehfuss, the Director of Physical Education for Women. The Microcosm notes that Meredith, an Associate Professor of English, was known on campus for her "forceful personality and executive ability" which "shaped the Dickinson collegiate world".

Dean Josephine B. Meredith's Report "Women at Dickinson College", circa 1935

Date
circa 1935

During her time as the Dean of Women at Dickinson College, Dean Josephine Meredith wrote a report entitled "Women at Dickinson College." Dean Meredith, an early female graduate of Dickinson College (class of 1901), utilized both her experiences as a female student and the Dean of Women to compile a report on the conditions for and experiences of female students. Thus, in 18 sections, she highlights living conditions, extracurricular life, social life, religious life, and academic life at the College.

Women and Fraternity Dances

Date
circa 1920

This essay by Dean Meredith outlined the problems faced when women attended fraternity dances. She argued that such dances were chaperoned however, before and after the dance was not. Often women would to travel to such events and it was impossible to watch them all the time. Thus, improper behavior occured between men and women.

Dickinson College Women and Soldiers

Date
circa 1920

In a letter to Dean Filler, Dean Meredith explained the College's policy on female students' relations with men of the War College. According to Dean Meredith, the female students often go to the War College to entertain the soldiers. However, there is a strict rule that prohibits women from "entertaining a young man not of the student body without special permission from the Dean of Women." She further explains that such a ruling is not "against the Uniform" but rather against a "chance acquaintance."
 
 

Dean Meredith's Family Works at Metzger Hall

Date
January 22, 1920

In her letter to President Morgan dated January 22, 1920, Dean Meredith discusses the running of the household at Metzger Hall. According to Meredith, in order to run the Hall, "two cooks, two house maids, two waitresses, a dishwasher, and George [a janitor]" are needed. The Dean of Women is concerned that the current staff, hired by Sarah K. Ege (the "Lady in charge of Metzger College"), are stealing from the college. Moreover, she argues that they do not do their jobs.

Dean Meredith Organizes a Physical Training Program at Metzger Hall for Female Students

Date
June 24, 1927

In a letter to President Morgan while on the S. S. Arabic in 1927, Dean Meredith explains her plans for the new female physical training program. She and Miss Frances Janney, instructor in physical culture, discussed the equipment needed as well as the text books required for the program. Dean Meredith ends the letter and proclaims that "physical education will progress next semester."