Party

"Dating," "Dancing," and "Chaperonage" in Dean Meredith's Report "Women at Dickinson College"

Date
circa 1935

In her essay "Women at Dickinson College", Dean Meredith discussed dating, dances, and chaperonage at Dickinson College. She explained, "The college is sometimes criticized because boys and girls are together socially so much. Other criticism is not just but it is somewhat merited. About 8 couples can be so conspicuous that they give the college an unenviable reputation." Meredith argued that it is easier to control the relationships if the woman lived in Metzger, however, it was much more difficult to control commuters.

"Girls' Fraternities" in Josephine Brunyate Meredith's report "Women at Dickinson College"

Date
c1935

In her essay "Women at Dickinson College," Josephine Brunyate Meredith has a section in which she discussed "Women's Fraternities" (now referred to as sororities) at Dickinson College. Meredith explained that "We have never had such good spirit existing between the Fraternities as exists at present. Pan-Hellenic rules and rushing methods, the result of years of hard work and experiment are now fairly satisfactory to everybody." Pleased with the women's work, Meredith argued that the college must provide better housing for the female fraternities as they do for the male fraternities.

President Morgan Advises Dean Meredith to Alter the Rules for Women at Metzger Hall

Date
November 4, 1919

In a letter dated November 4, 1919, President Morgan writes to Dean Meredith regarding the rules of conduct for women at Metzger Hall after viewing them in a copy of the yearbook. Morgan argues that the present system of self-governance among the women is most desireable. However, he is concernd that the rules in place are lax and "too loosely drawn." This is particularly evident in reference to the rules regarding Hall absences.

Female Students Provided a Night of Entertainment in their Dormitories

Date
1898

The history of the senior class of 1898 in the Microcosm discussed a social event thrown by the female students at Dickinson. On October 12, 1897 these females students provided an "evening of intense social enjoyment" in their dormitory. All sorts of entertainments ensued, and that the "music was in abundance". It was also noted that the "girls were at their best that night," and that the College President's wife and other notable townspeople graced the event with their prescence.

"I was a Co-ed": The Unofficial Dean of Early Female Students at Dickinson College

Date
1951

In her memoir recounting her experiences as an early female student at Dickinson College, Low recalls a fellow "co-ed" sophomore who "was more like a Dean than just another student." Though Low never mentions the woman's name, she explains that "She took her work seriously and co-education as her personal responsibility." Moreover, at an early party hosted by the sophomore "co-ed" she urged her fellow female students to sign a pledge proclaiming that "'We are set apart, destined for careers, we were superior and should not allow any entangling alliances to interfere with our life work." Unf

"I was a Co-ed": An Early "Co-ed" Party

Date
1951

In her memoir recounting her time at Dickinson, Elizabeth Low recalled a party for "co-eds." Hosted by a female student Low referred to as the unofficial "Dean" of female students, the party was an opportunity for early female students at Dickinson to develop a community. According to Low, "even at the party, her [the hostess] theme song was coeducation." Low explains that the party "was fun, and the only really good time some of those girls had during their entire college course."